complex prepositions


complex prepositions
complex prepositions
Complex (or compound) prepositions consist of two or more words together having the function of a preposition, e.g. according to, apart from, in accordance with, with regard to. Fowler (1926) objected to their overuse in journalism, ‘stuffing up the newspaper columns with a compost of nouny abstractions’. He had a point, but they cause little trouble today and should only be avoided, as a matter of clear style, when something more simple is available: e.g. about or concerning will often do in place of with regard to. Others, such as away from and out of, are straightforward and necessary, since away and out (unlike in) do not function as prepositions by themselves.

Modern English usage. 2014.

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